DIY Countertop Repair for Scratches and Scuffs

Granite and tile countertop repair

If you cook a lot, chances are your countertops have seen better days. Every scratch and chip tells a story, from that pan you dropped to the knife that slipped. The good news is that there are some simple countertop repairs you can do yourself to make your counters look like new and save some money in the process.

Granite

Granite countertops are known for their durability, but even granite can show signs of wear like scratches, chips and cracks with regular use. Granite is also one of the most expensive options when it comes to counters, so it’s lucky that there are inexpensive options to repair it.

To repair an unsightly crack or scratch in granite, you’ll need to gather a few materials: acetone or nail polish remover, an epoxy resin granite repair kit (you’ll find this at your local home improvement store), a scrub sponge, a razor blade, paper towels and a hairdryer.

Acetone works wonders for cutting through grease or any other residue to make your granite surface really clean. Wet a paper towel with it and wipe over your countertop (if you’re using nail polish remover, do a spot test first to make sure it doesn’t discolor your surface). Use your scrub sponge to further loosen any deposits, then wipe the granite down with another paper towel to make sure the surface is dry (hit it with the hairdryer for a few minutes on low to be sure).

Now you’re ready for the epoxy kit. Epoxy resin can be colored to match the dominant color of your granite for an undetectable repair. Mix the epoxy according to the manufacturer’s directions, then apply it to the crack with the stir stick included in the kit. Since the epoxy will settle a little as it cures, apply epoxy above the level of the crack. Put a piece of tape over the epoxy (this helps the surface flatten as it dries).

Tile

Repairing tile countertops can be easy if you have extra matching tiles saved. Identify the cracked tile that needs replacing, then use a grout saw to cut around and loosen the tile. Next, use a hammer to break the tile into pieces. Add a chisel to the equation to remove all the broken tile pieces, then vacuum up whatever’s left in terms of loose debris. Once you have a clean surface to work with, take your new tile and apply mortar to the back, pressing it into place. Once the mortar is dry, regrout around the tile and you’re done!

If you don’t have extra tile, you still have some options. First, you can use fine-grit sandpaper to fade scratches (just make sure you don’t rub too hard, otherwise you’ll end up with an irregular surface). For deeper scratches, nicks or chips, you can use an acrylic repair kit, available at any home improvement store, that’s colored to match your tile.

Butcher Block Counters

If you’ve been using your butcher block counter as a cutting board and want to breathe some life back into it, first you’ll have to thoroughly clean it.

  • For any stuck-on food residue, remove it with the edge of a metal spatula, taking care not to gouge the wood
  • Next, use hot water, a scrub sponge and some mild dish soap to scrub the counter. Rinse well with a clean dishcloth and more hot water.
  • After the countertop dries completely, you can move on to the next step, sanding.

Preferably you want to use an orbital sander for this, using fine-grit sandpaper and applying light pressure over the entire surface of the counter for an even finish. This helps remove light scratches and scuffs. For deeper scratches and gouges in the wood, you can fill them with wood putty that matches the color of your counter. Roll the putty between your fingers and pack it tightly into any deeper scratches. Once it dries and hardens, you can sand the putty down to a smooth surface. Finish by conditioning your butcher block counter with a light coat or two of mineral oil.

Repairing your countertops is an easy way to add value to your home once it’s time to sell. National Property Inspections is here to help you make the most of your biggest investment, so find your local NPI inspector today and make an appointment.

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